Jun 102013
 

Andy ReidToday starts our series taking a quick peek at the state of all thirty two teams as they prepare for the 2013 season. Yes, it’s early and training camps are still far off, but the bulk of the roster moves have been made and we have enough information to make an educated guess on what 2013 holds for each club. We will go in draft order from worst to first, looking at why each team might be better or worse this coming season. We kick off our series with a look at the Kansas City Chiefs.

1. Kansas City Chiefs
Head Coach: Andy Reid
2012 Record: 2-14
2012 Offense: 211 points scored, 32nd in points, 24th in yards (32nd passing, 5th rushing)
2012 Defense 425 points allowed, 25th in points, 20th in yards (21st passing, 27th rushing)

Key Additions
Head Coach Andy Reid, QB Alex Smith, WR Donnie Avery, LB Akeem Jordan, CB Daunta Robinson, T Geoff Schwartz, CB Sean Smith, T Eric Fisher, QB Chase Daniel, TE Anthony Fasano

Key Losses
QB Matt Cassel, C Ryan Lilja, QB Brady Quinn, T Eric Winston

Why 2013 will be better
The Chiefs had six Pro Bowl players on the roster in 2012 and still managed to go 2-14. Enter Andy Reid and Alex Smith, who are proven winners. The air has changed in Kansas City, and the infusion of Alex Smith, Avery, Fisher, Robinson and Sean Smith promise to change the culture in western Missouri. Having an effective passing attack will make Jamaal Charles a more effective back. The improved offense will keep a very talented defense on the sidelines a little longer. The defense collapsed in 2013, at least in part due to the terrible, mistake-prone offense. Adding Robinson and Smith improves an under-performing secondary.

Why 2013 will be worse
2013 can’t get much worse than 2012, but it’s possible (though not likely) that Reid’s attempt to cobble together talent in the midst of a coaching change will fall flat. Even then, the Chiefs can expect to improve on a two win campaign. Still, Reid seems to be trying to duplicate a pass-oriented attack that he relied on in Philadelphia, and the Chiefs may not have the talent or the interior line to pull it off.

Outlook
It all starts with the offense, and Alex Smith and Chase Daniel represent a major step up over Matt Cassel and Brady Quinn. Keeping Dwayne Bowe was important (not to mention a mild surprise), as was adding Donnie Avery as a complement. Smith is a proven winner, and the Chiefs are highly likely to improve on the pathetic 13 points a game scored in 2012. The Chiefs may well be the most improved team in the AFC in 2013, but winning divisional games is going to be the key to their success this coming season. At worst, the Chiefs should be capable of pulling off four or five wins. At best, they are capable of going 8-8 and competing as a dark horse playoff candidate.

Jan 102013
 

carousel_1New Jaguars GM David Caldwell made his first major change to the team, firing Head Coach Mike Mularkey after just one season at the helm, during which the Jaguars went 2-14. Caldwell previously worked with Mularkey in Atlanta, but seems to have wanted a fresh start with his own head coach.

Here’s a summary of where teams are after the immediate firings following the end of the regular season.

Arizona Cardinals
New General Manager: Steve Keim
Head Coach: Vacant

Buffalo Bills
New Head Coach: Doug Marrone

Carolina Panthers
New General Manager: Dave Gettleman

Chicago Bears
Head Coach: Vacant

Cleveland Browns
General Manager: Vacant
Head Coach: Vacant

Jacksonville Jaguars
New General Manager: Dave Caldwell
Head Coach: Vacant

Kansas City Chiefs
General Manager: Vacant
New Head Coach: Andy Reid

New York Jets
General Manager: Vacant

Philadelphia Eagles
Head Coach: Vacant

San Diego Chargers
New General Manager: Tom Telesco
Head Coach: Vacant

We will keep updating this post as new hires are announced.

Jan 052013
 

not-the-droidsI’m sorry to rain on the parade of Kansas City Chiefs’ fans who think that the hiring of Andy Reid means that the team is about to experience a significant turnaround. The more likely outcome is more of the same in Western Missouri.

It’s not to say that Andy Reid isn’t a successful head coach. His resume with the Eagles is impressive… a 130-93-1 regular reason record in 14 seasons in Philadelphia, along with seven division championships, four appearances in the NFC Championship, and one appearance in the Super Bow, where the Eagles lost to the New England Patriots. If we were buying a new car and looking at the 54-year old Reid’s resume as a spec sheet, this would seem like a pretty flashy vehicle.

The trouble is that in the NFL there is no equivalent of a test drive; it’s buy or pass. And only after driving off the lot will Chiefs’ fans likely discover that the engine isn’t as powerful as hoped for, the tires leak, and the odometer has been set back so that the 100,005 miles on the vehicle now reads 000,005. This is not an experiment that is going to turn out well.

Without trying to “hate” on Reid, there were plenty of warning signs that should have made Clark Hunt pause before hiring his new head coach. His history with the Eagles’ carries a great deal of success, but also held warning signs that seem to have been ignored. Let’s start with Reid’s inconceivable decision to move offensive line coach Juan Castillo into the role of defensive coordinator in 2011, a move that improved neither the defense nor the offense. Reid then maintained Castillo in that role for 2012 despite the obvious evidence of a failed experiment the year before. Reid finally let Castillo go in October, but the damage had already been done for the 2012 season. There was also the matter of not reigning in defensive line coach Jim Washburn, whose stubbornly adhered to a defensive scheme that did not match the strengths of his players while also sowing seeds of discontent. Washburn was eventually fired as well, but the damage had already been done.

Then there is the matter of Reid’s actual coaching skills. Former Eagles’ linebacker Jeremiah Trotter, who played for Reid for seven seasons, was openly critical of Reid’s coaching skills this week. “If it come down to both teams were even, talent-wise,” Trotter stated. “I think the opponent’s team would win if it came down to coaching, Andy Reid got outcoached in a lot of games man, a lot of big games.”

Proof of Trotter’s complaint? Eagles’ fans know full well that there were countless occasions where Reid mismanaged the game clock, wasted time outs, and struggled with miscommunication on the sidelines.  Philly fans have also watched as talented running backs like Duce Staley, Brian Westbrook, and more recently LeSean McCoy went under-utilized because Reid was too much in love with a gimmicky passing game. As they sometimes say in Philly, Reid loved to throw in order to set up the pass. And of course there was the poor offensive play calling in the 2004 Super Bowl, made worse by the slow march drive that squandered the Eagles’ chance to pull off the upset win. Reid is a brilliant football thinker, but he is also a slow football thinker.

Finally, Reid has final say over personnel in Kansas City. Yet his track record does not suggest that giving him this type of authority will serve the franchise well. Reid managed to turn a quarterback duo of Donovan McNabb and Kevin Kolb into Michael Vick. The team gave up on Kolb far too soon simply because Reid was in love with a player who has missed 17 games in four seasons due to injury, often related to Vick’s reckless playing style. But even when Vick was on the filed, the results were far from spectacular. His touchdown to interception ration of 52 to 30 while with the Eagles was offset by his 13 lost fumbles as a quarterback and another 6 lost fumbles as a runner. While I understand the chance that Reid wanted to take on giving Vick a second chance, particularly in the wake of his own problems with his sons, but was this a player really worthy of a $100 million commitment? Reid then pieced together the infamous “Dream Team” of 2011, but was unable to successfully manage personalities, or instill the discipline needed for the team (particularly the defense) to success as a unit. His 12-20 record over the last two seasons is an accurate depiction of the situation that he himself has created in Philadelphia. In 2012 Reid failed to address depth problems on the offensive line, then continued relying on the passing game with the porous line, adding to Vick’s injury woes. Only when Nick Foles took over did the team begin running the ball more consistently and utilizing screen passes to open up the passing game.

Some might be tempted to argue that Andy Reid is simply tired out in Philadelphia, and needs a change of venue, a new project to work on. And that’s where Kansas City looks like the answer. They have a talented roster that includes five Pro Bowlers in 2012, including Eric Berry, Jamaal Charles, Dustin Colquitt, Tamba Hali, and Derrick Johnson. All the team needs it seems to get them closer to the playoffs is a quarterback, and Reid has had success with McNabb and Jeff Garcia, had brief success with AJ Feeley and Kevin Kolb, and rescued Michael Vick’s career from the (ahem) doghouse. So, just looking at the spec sheet again, Reid looks like a reasonable answer, offering respite from the frustrating failure of Scott Pioli’s reign in the City of Fountains. Reid’s history suggests that the Chiefs will experience some success, and the talent is in place to do so. With the addition (or improvement) of a quarterback, the pieces are in place for the Chiefs to contend for a playoff spot in the nest two to three seasons. But just as I always said that Andy Reid would never win the Super Bowl coaching the Eagles, I am equally confident in saying that Reid will also never win the Lombardi Trophy as the coach of the Chiefs. While it might be enough for fans of long-suffering franchises such as the Chiefs, Browns, Cardinals and others to simply make the playoffs, winning the Super Bowl is the true measure of success in the NFL.

What Chiefs’ fans are about to discover is what Eagles’ fans already know; having a team with potential doesn’t ease the pain when that potential goes unfulfilled.

Dec 312012
 

andy-reidThey are falling fast and furious this morning.

The Philadelphia Eagles have fired Head Coach Andy Reid, who guided the team to a 4-12 record this season, following the “Dream Team’s” 8-8 performance last season. Reid has been the Head Coach since 1999, compiling a 130-93-1 record in his time with the team and a 10-9 post-season record that included seven division titles and four trips to the NFC Championship Game, but only one Super Bowl appearance, where they lost to the Patriots during the 2004 season.

“Andy Reid won the most games of any head coach in Eagles history and he is someone I respect greatly and will remain friends with for many years to come,” Eagles’ owner Jeffrey Lurie said in a statement. “But, it is time for the Eagles to move in a new direction. Coach Reid leaves us with a winning tradition that we can build upon. And we are very excited about the future.”

Speculation will run rampant about where Reid will land for 2013, yet it is entirely possible that Reid will not land a head coaching position given the ones that are likely to be available. We will likely have our answer to this question in the next few weeks.

Nov 282012
 

There’s a shake up at the top of the Power Rankings this week, as our contributors seem to have had enough of the narrow victories coming from both the Atlanta Falcons and Houston Texans. Yes, they keep winning, but the victories themselves raise questions as to whether either team will survive the divisional round of the playoffs.

Our new Number One? It’s the New England Patriots, who have now won five straight and seem to be pulling away from the pack as we hit the home stretch of the regular season. The Patriots’ consecutive beat downs of both the Colts and Jets (teams that they should beat down), have us believing that the team is starting to peak at exactly the right time. The bigger question is whether the Patriots can sustain that into February, and tough home tests against both the Texans and the 49ers in the next three weeks will help us gauge whether or not they really deserve the top spot. The 49ers come in second this week, and might have come in first, save for the uncertainty surrounding Jim Harbaugh’s creation of a quarterback controversy in the City by the Bay. We like Colin Kaepernick and think the offense is more dynamic with him on the field, but Alex Smith has done nothing but win in his last 26 contests (20-5-1). So exactly why is Kaepernick starting? Having him start in the post-season would be an invitation to destruction as top teams begin to scheme on how to beat the developing star. The team’s consistency has improved of late, but playing quarterback games doesn’t seem like a recipe for success.

Here are our Week 12 rankings:

1. New England Patriots (8-3, +3, W5) – The Patriots are still fighting for a first round bye, but seem poised to make another of their late season runs; will it net Super Bowl success this time around?

2. San Francisco 49ers (8-2-1, U, W2) – Kaepernick is the future, but why isn’t Smith the present?

3. Houston Texans (10-1, -2, W5) – Will Gary Kubiak be sending Jim Schwartz a pack of red hankies for Christmas?

4. Atlanta Falcons (10-1, -1, W2) – OK, we’re pretty sure they’ll score more than two points in the playoffs, but why are they feeling like a one and done team?

5. New York Giants (7-4, +3, W1) – Is it that time of the year again?

6. Baltimore Ravens (9-2, -1, W4) – Will gifts like last Sunday keep happening, or is this team’s luck about to run out?

7. Denver Broncos (8-3, U, W6) – Is Peyton Manning simply changing where he has great regular seasons, only to flame out in the playoffs?

8. Chicago Bears (8-3, +1, W1) – Nice win against the Vikings, but are we the only ones waiting for this team to collapse?

9. Green Bay Packers (7-4, -3, L1) – And if the Bears collapse, can the Packers catch them?

10. Indianapolis Colts (7-4, +5, W1) – They responded well to a blowout loss, now can they take control of a playoff spot?

11. Tampa Bay Buccaneers (6-5, +1, L1) – With a tough loss out of the way, can they bounce back like Indy and nudge the Seahawks out of the way for a playoff spot?

12. Cincinnati Bengals (6-5, +4, W3) – They are making noise now, but can they beat the Steelers and Ravens in Weeks 16 and 17, when things really matter?

13. Seattle Seahakws (6-5, -2, L1) – Are they ever going to win again outside of Seattle?

14. Pittsburgh Steelers (6-5, -4, L2) – Do they really have any chance without a healthy Ben?

15. New Orleans Saints (5-6, -2, L1) – Is the offensive line really as bad as the defense, or did it just look that way?

16. Minnesota Vikings (6-5, -2, L1) – They really were just pretending this year, weren’t they?

17. Washington Redskins (5-6, +3, W2) – Have the Redskins finally left the NFC East basement for good?

18. Dallas Cowboys (5-6, -1, L1) – If the Cowboys got diagnosed for collective Schizophrenia, would the medication get the team in trouble for using performance enhancing drugs?

19. Detroit Lions (4-7, -1, L3) – Are the Lions victims of bad luck, or are they their own worst enemies?

20. St. Louis Rams (4-6-1, +4, W1) – Will that tie cost the Rams a shot at a wildcard?

21. Buffalo Bills (4-7, +1, L1) – Is Chan Gailey preventing the offense from performing better?

22. Miami Dolphins (5-6, +3, W1) – Will the Patriots crush the Fins wildcard hopes this weekend?

23. Arizona Cardinals (4-7, -4, L7) – Is this team only a quarterback away, or do seven straight losses signify a much deeper problem?

24. Cleveland Browns (3-8, +3, W1) – Did the Browns just cost themselves a top five draft pick?

25. Tennessee Titans (4-7, -2, L1) – Do you think Peyton knew this was coming when he decided to play in Denver?

26. San Diego Chargers (4-7, -5, L3) – 4th and 29? Seriously? Exactly why does Norv Turner still have a job?

27. New York Jets (4-7, -1, L1) – Between the “butt fumble” and refusal to make personnel changes, why do Rex Ryan and Mark Sanchez still have jobs?

28. Carolina Panthers (3-8, +1, W1) – Is Cam Newton really handling adversity well, or do things just always look better after a win?

29. Jacksonville Jaguars (2-9, +1, W1) – How eager do you think Shahid Khan is to start cleaning house?

30. Philadelphia Eagles (3-8, -2, L7) – Exactly why does Andy Reid still have a job?

31. Oakland Raiders (3-8, U, L4) – Did Al Davis’ will require that the Raiders keep playing the way they did when he was alive?

32. Kansas City Chiefs (1-10, U, L8) – Exactly why do Romeo Crennel and Scott Pioli still have jobs?

Week 11 Recap

 Posted by
Nov 212012
 

It was a wild week in the NFL in Week 11, as three teams blew double digit leads to drop games late or in overtime. The Patriots and Broncos both stayed on a roll, and both lost a key player for several games. Meanwhile, the 49ers and Bears offered contrasting views of teams operating with backup quarterbacks, and the Bengals gained in the playoff race while the Lions continued to find a way to lose.

Here’s the Week 11 recap:

Week 10 Recap

 Posted by
Nov 122012
 

What did Week 10 teach us?

First, that no one is going undefeated this season now that the New Orleans Saints have taken out the Atlanta Falcons to drop them to 8-1.

Second, that Rex Ryan seems to be determined to get fired alongside Mark Sanchez at the end of the 2012 season.

Finally, that the Bears have a much better chance of winning games when their defense is on the field.

Here are the Week 10 results:

Week 8 Recap

 Posted by
Oct 292012
 

Another Sunday, another wild slate of games in the NFL. The theme of this week’s outcome is job security, or in some cases the lack of job security for key coaches and players. There’s still half a season left to play, but some themes are beginning to take shape.

Here are your results from Week 8:

  • The Buccaneers whip the Vikings 36-17 and show that they may not yet be a serious playoff threat, but are a dangerous team to play; Doug Martin has a huge game with 135 yards rushing while Josh Freeman is effective in throwing for 262 yards and three touchdowns
  • Da Bears edge the Panthers 23-22 with late rally in ugly win on a game-winning field goal by Robbie Gould; Ron Rivera edges closer to the door depite a game effort from Carolina
  • Yes, it was played in the slop, but Norv Turner’s job security hangs by a thread after the Browns upset the Chargers 7-6; Trent Richardson runs for 122 yards in a solid outing
  • Matthew Stafford finally looks like Matthew Stafford for a week as the Lions edge the Seahawks 28-24 behind 352 yards and three touchdown passes by the Lions’ quarterback; Jim Schwartz moves off of the hot seat while Russell Wilson and Marshawn Lynch look good in last minute loss
  • The Packers struggle against the Jaguars’ defense but emerge with a 24-15 win; Blaine Gabbert outduels Aaron Rodgers but Rodgers earns the win
  • The Dolphins help edge Rex Ryan and Mark Sanchez closer to finding a new color with a convincing 30-9 win; Reggie Bush wins the war of words and the game; perhaps the Jets should be apologizing to their fans
  • Andy Reid and Michael Vick updating their resumes after Matt Ryan and Julio Jones team up to whip the Eagles 30-17; Falcons now 7-0
  • Ben Roethlisberger, Jonathan Dwyer, and swarming Steelers defense halt RG3 and the Redskins 27-12
  • Patriots light up the Rams 45-7 as Brady is sharp and Ridley surpasses 100 rushing yards again; defense improved as both teams head into bye week
  • Andrew Luck and Vick Ballard connect for beautiful game winning touchdown in overtime as the Colts beat the Titans 19-13; so much for thinking that Matt Hasselbeck would claim the starting job back from Jake Locker
  • Raiders top the Chiefs 26-16; Brady Quinn’s reign lasts twelve and a half minutes while Darren McFadden rushes for 112 yards
  • Giants win a wild one as the Cowboys commit six turnovers in a 29-24 loss; Jason Garrett and Tony Romo now 3-4 and will no doubt evoke some reactions from Jerry this week
  • Broncos crush Saints 34-14 behind big performances from Peyton Manning, Willis McGahee, and DeMaryius Thomas; worst defense in the league just gets worse for the Saints
  • still to come: San Francisco – Arizona
May 222012
 

 

Philadelphia Eagles

Head Coach: Andy Reid

Projected Starting Quarterback: Michael Vick

2011 Record:  8 wins, 8 losses (2nd in NFC East)

No postseason appearance

4th in Total Offense, 8th in Total Defense

2002-2011 10 year record: 99 wins, 60 losses, 1 tie (4th in NFL)

7 wins, 7 losses in postseason

0-1 in Super Bowl appearances

0-2 All-time in Super Bowl