Jun 102013
 

Andy ReidToday starts our series taking a quick peek at the state of all thirty two teams as they prepare for the 2013 season. Yes, it’s early and training camps are still far off, but the bulk of the roster moves have been made and we have enough information to make an educated guess on what 2013 holds for each club. We will go in draft order from worst to first, looking at why each team might be better or worse this coming season. We kick off our series with a look at the Kansas City Chiefs.

1. Kansas City Chiefs
Head Coach: Andy Reid
2012 Record: 2-14
2012 Offense: 211 points scored, 32nd in points, 24th in yards (32nd passing, 5th rushing)
2012 Defense 425 points allowed, 25th in points, 20th in yards (21st passing, 27th rushing)

Key Additions
Head Coach Andy Reid, QB Alex Smith, WR Donnie Avery, LB Akeem Jordan, CB Daunta Robinson, T Geoff Schwartz, CB Sean Smith, T Eric Fisher, QB Chase Daniel, TE Anthony Fasano

Key Losses
QB Matt Cassel, C Ryan Lilja, QB Brady Quinn, T Eric Winston

Why 2013 will be better
The Chiefs had six Pro Bowl players on the roster in 2012 and still managed to go 2-14. Enter Andy Reid and Alex Smith, who are proven winners. The air has changed in Kansas City, and the infusion of Alex Smith, Avery, Fisher, Robinson and Sean Smith promise to change the culture in western Missouri. Having an effective passing attack will make Jamaal Charles a more effective back. The improved offense will keep a very talented defense on the sidelines a little longer. The defense collapsed in 2013, at least in part due to the terrible, mistake-prone offense. Adding Robinson and Smith improves an under-performing secondary.

Why 2013 will be worse
2013 can’t get much worse than 2012, but it’s possible (though not likely) that Reid’s attempt to cobble together talent in the midst of a coaching change will fall flat. Even then, the Chiefs can expect to improve on a two win campaign. Still, Reid seems to be trying to duplicate a pass-oriented attack that he relied on in Philadelphia, and the Chiefs may not have the talent or the interior line to pull it off.

Outlook
It all starts with the offense, and Alex Smith and Chase Daniel represent a major step up over Matt Cassel and Brady Quinn. Keeping Dwayne Bowe was important (not to mention a mild surprise), as was adding Donnie Avery as a complement. Smith is a proven winner, and the Chiefs are highly likely to improve on the pathetic 13 points a game scored in 2012. The Chiefs may well be the most improved team in the AFC in 2013, but winning divisional games is going to be the key to their success this coming season. At worst, the Chiefs should be capable of pulling off four or five wins. At best, they are capable of going 8-8 and competing as a dark horse playoff candidate.

Jan 052013
 

not-the-droidsI’m sorry to rain on the parade of Kansas City Chiefs’ fans who think that the hiring of Andy Reid means that the team is about to experience a significant turnaround. The more likely outcome is more of the same in Western Missouri.

It’s not to say that Andy Reid isn’t a successful head coach. His resume with the Eagles is impressive… a 130-93-1 regular reason record in 14 seasons in Philadelphia, along with seven division championships, four appearances in the NFC Championship, and one appearance in the Super Bow, where the Eagles lost to the New England Patriots. If we were buying a new car and looking at the 54-year old Reid’s resume as a spec sheet, this would seem like a pretty flashy vehicle.

The trouble is that in the NFL there is no equivalent of a test drive; it’s buy or pass. And only after driving off the lot will Chiefs’ fans likely discover that the engine isn’t as powerful as hoped for, the tires leak, and the odometer has been set back so that the 100,005 miles on the vehicle now reads 000,005. This is not an experiment that is going to turn out well.

Without trying to “hate” on Reid, there were plenty of warning signs that should have made Clark Hunt pause before hiring his new head coach. His history with the Eagles’ carries a great deal of success, but also held warning signs that seem to have been ignored. Let’s start with Reid’s inconceivable decision to move offensive line coach Juan Castillo into the role of defensive coordinator in 2011, a move that improved neither the defense nor the offense. Reid then maintained Castillo in that role for 2012 despite the obvious evidence of a failed experiment the year before. Reid finally let Castillo go in October, but the damage had already been done for the 2012 season. There was also the matter of not reigning in defensive line coach Jim Washburn, whose stubbornly adhered to a defensive scheme that did not match the strengths of his players while also sowing seeds of discontent. Washburn was eventually fired as well, but the damage had already been done.

Then there is the matter of Reid’s actual coaching skills. Former Eagles’ linebacker Jeremiah Trotter, who played for Reid for seven seasons, was openly critical of Reid’s coaching skills this week. “If it come down to both teams were even, talent-wise,” Trotter stated. “I think the opponent’s team would win if it came down to coaching, Andy Reid got outcoached in a lot of games man, a lot of big games.”

Proof of Trotter’s complaint? Eagles’ fans know full well that there were countless occasions where Reid mismanaged the game clock, wasted time outs, and struggled with miscommunication on the sidelines.  Philly fans have also watched as talented running backs like Duce Staley, Brian Westbrook, and more recently LeSean McCoy went under-utilized because Reid was too much in love with a gimmicky passing game. As they sometimes say in Philly, Reid loved to throw in order to set up the pass. And of course there was the poor offensive play calling in the 2004 Super Bowl, made worse by the slow march drive that squandered the Eagles’ chance to pull off the upset win. Reid is a brilliant football thinker, but he is also a slow football thinker.

Finally, Reid has final say over personnel in Kansas City. Yet his track record does not suggest that giving him this type of authority will serve the franchise well. Reid managed to turn a quarterback duo of Donovan McNabb and Kevin Kolb into Michael Vick. The team gave up on Kolb far too soon simply because Reid was in love with a player who has missed 17 games in four seasons due to injury, often related to Vick’s reckless playing style. But even when Vick was on the filed, the results were far from spectacular. His touchdown to interception ration of 52 to 30 while with the Eagles was offset by his 13 lost fumbles as a quarterback and another 6 lost fumbles as a runner. While I understand the chance that Reid wanted to take on giving Vick a second chance, particularly in the wake of his own problems with his sons, but was this a player really worthy of a $100 million commitment? Reid then pieced together the infamous “Dream Team” of 2011, but was unable to successfully manage personalities, or instill the discipline needed for the team (particularly the defense) to success as a unit. His 12-20 record over the last two seasons is an accurate depiction of the situation that he himself has created in Philadelphia. In 2012 Reid failed to address depth problems on the offensive line, then continued relying on the passing game with the porous line, adding to Vick’s injury woes. Only when Nick Foles took over did the team begin running the ball more consistently and utilizing screen passes to open up the passing game.

Some might be tempted to argue that Andy Reid is simply tired out in Philadelphia, and needs a change of venue, a new project to work on. And that’s where Kansas City looks like the answer. They have a talented roster that includes five Pro Bowlers in 2012, including Eric Berry, Jamaal Charles, Dustin Colquitt, Tamba Hali, and Derrick Johnson. All the team needs it seems to get them closer to the playoffs is a quarterback, and Reid has had success with McNabb and Jeff Garcia, had brief success with AJ Feeley and Kevin Kolb, and rescued Michael Vick’s career from the (ahem) doghouse. So, just looking at the spec sheet again, Reid looks like a reasonable answer, offering respite from the frustrating failure of Scott Pioli’s reign in the City of Fountains. Reid’s history suggests that the Chiefs will experience some success, and the talent is in place to do so. With the addition (or improvement) of a quarterback, the pieces are in place for the Chiefs to contend for a playoff spot in the nest two to three seasons. But just as I always said that Andy Reid would never win the Super Bowl coaching the Eagles, I am equally confident in saying that Reid will also never win the Lombardi Trophy as the coach of the Chiefs. While it might be enough for fans of long-suffering franchises such as the Chiefs, Browns, Cardinals and others to simply make the playoffs, winning the Super Bowl is the true measure of success in the NFL.

What Chiefs’ fans are about to discover is what Eagles’ fans already know; having a team with potential doesn’t ease the pain when that potential goes unfulfilled.

Jan 042013
 

Scott PioliThe Scott Pioli era is over in Kansas City as the Chiefs are set to announce a deal with Andy Reid as their new Head Coach.

Chiefs’ owner Clark Hunt issued the standard termination statement regarding Pioli. “After several productive conversations, we made the difficult decision to part ways with Scott Pioli and allow him to pursue other opportunities. Scott has been an invaluable member of the Chiefs family since joining us in 2009, and we sincerely appreciate his tremendous contributions over the last four years.”

Pioli, who took over the Chiefs’ front office in 2009 but was unable to come close to making the Chiefs a contender, released a statement as well.

“I would like to thank Norma, Clark and the Hunt Family for the opportunity that they gave me four years ago. I’d also like to thank the players, coaches, scouts and countless other employees, throughout the organization and at Arrowhead Stadium that have worked so hard during my time here. I would also like to genuinely thank Chiefs fans. The bottom line is that I did not accomplish all of what I set out to do. To the Hunt family – to the great fans of the Kansas City Chiefs – to the players, all employees and alumni, I truly apologize for not getting the job done,” Pioli said.

Dec 312012
 

Romeo CrennelHead Coach Romeo Crennel has been fired by the Kansas City Chiefs. Kansas City went 2-14 this season, earning the first overall draft pick in the 2013 NFL Draft. The 65 year old Crennel built his career as a defensive genius, winning three Super Bowls in New England as the defensive coordinator under Bill Belichick, but has struggled as an NFL head coach, going just 28-55. Crennel was 4-15 in Kansas City, coaching the Chiefs to a 2-1 record in the final three weeks of the 2011 season.

The Chiefs appear to be leaning towards keeping GM Scott Pioli, but no final decision has been communicated yet. Chiefs’ owner Clark Hunt may be inclined to give the 47 year old Pioli a chance to turn the situation around with the top draft pick in hand.

 

Dec 012012
 

Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Jovan Belcher shot and killed his girlfriend this morning before going to Arrowhead Stadium and fatally shooting himself as team personnel tried to stop him, police said.

Police Capt. David Lindaman said Belcher, 25, and his girlfriend, 22, got into an argument around 7 a.m. at their home in Kansas City. Around 7:50 a.m., Belcher shot his girlfriend multiple times. She was taken to a hospital, where she was pronounced dead. Following the shooting, Belcher to the Chiefs practice facility at Arrowhead. Police were called to the stadium around 8:10 a.m. When Belcher arrived there he encountered General Manager Scott Pioli, Coach Romeo Crennel and other team personnel. Police said Chiefs staff attempted to keep Belcher from committing additional acts of violence. When police arrived, they heard a gunshot and found that Belcher had shot himself in the head.

The Chiefs released the following statement: “We can confirm that there was an incident at Arrowhead earlier this morning. We are cooperating with authorites in their investigation.”

Belcher, originally from Long Island, N.Y., had been with the Chiefs for four years. He joined the team as an undrafted free agent out of the University of Maine. Belcher and his girlfriend had a three month old daughter.

May 222012
 

 

Kansas City Chiefs

Head Coach: Romeo Crennel

Projected Starting Quarterback: Matt Cassel

2011 Record:  7 wins, 9 losses (4th in AFC West)

No postseason appearance

27th in Total Offense, 11th in Total Defense

2002-2011 10 year record: 74 wins, 86 losses (T-20th in NFL)

0 wins, 3 loss in postseason

No Super Bowl appearances

1-1 All-time in Super Bowl