Dec 032012
 

For anyone wanting to blame Mark Sanchez for the plight of the New York Jets, remember this; the reason he has been playing when he might have been pulled by many other coaches, was because Head Coach Rex Ryan allowed him to play. So while this Patriots’ fan is glad to see that Ryan finally had the courage to bench Sanchez and bring in Greg McElroy, who rallied the Jets to win over the Arizona Cardinals yesterday, the fact is that the decision is too little, too late to allow Ryan to escape responsibility for riding so long on the back of a quarterback who simply is not capable of carrying the load.

Forgive me for playing the comparison card, but maybe Ryan should have been more willing to kiss Bill Belichick’s rings and learn something from the mastermind in New England. Belichick banked on a 199th draft pick in Tom Brady over an established starter in Drew Bledsoe even after Bledsoe was cleared to return from injury, a move not unlike the gambit that Jim Harbaugh is trying to pull off in San Francisco with Colin Kaepernick. Had Brady faltered, that might have been a lethal blow to Belichick’s coaching career in New England, and the Patriots would not enjoy the three Super Bowl banners that currently hang in Gillette Stadium. Sometimes successful coaching requires calculated risks, even if the odds don’t seem to be immediately in your favor.

But in Rex Ryan’s case, there was ample warning that Sanchez was never going to be the quarterback he was drafted to be. Yes, he “got” the Jets to two AFC Championship games, but is there anyone who really thinks that the Jets’ defense was not more responsible for those achievements?

Let’s look at the information that Rex Ryan had available to him going into 2012.

  • In Sanchez’ first three seasons, his completion percentage never exceeded 56.7%; it is at 55% this season
  • In his first three seasons, Sanchez’ passer rating never exceeded 78.2; it is at 71.4 this season
  • In his first three seasons, Sanchez had thrown 55 touchdown passes against 51 interceptions; this year he is at 12 touchdowns and 13 interceptions
  • Despite improvements claimed by his coaches, Sanchez inevitably demonstrated a proclivity for mental errors that cost the Jets in key games; in 2012 this has been a regular occurrence that culminated in an embarrassing performance on Thanksgiving night where two key Sanchez mental mistakes led to turnovers

The Jets’ faithful will rightly argue that Sanchez saw better statistics in each of his first three seasons; he was definitely improving. Ah yes, but improving into what? At the end of Sanchez’ “best” season, he was the 23rd ranked quarterback in the National Football League. 23rd. So the Jets wasted three years in developing a quarterback who would “blossom” into  the 29th percentile? Is that an accomplishment to be proud of? In a league where young quarterbacks get routinely chewed up and spat out too quickly, the Jets have been more than gracious in giving Sanchez time to develop into something more than he is. And the reward for this patience is a quarterback who is now ranked 32nd in the NFL.

But that isn’t Ryan’s greatest crime. Ryan had gone out and gotten Drew Stanton as a capable backup for Sanchez in the event that he faltered, only to cash that in for what was behind Door #2…. Tim Tebow, the quarterback who never was. Then the Jets made it worse by committing $8.5 million to Sanchez in 2013 in order to soothe his hurt feelings. Now the burden of winning potentially falls to third-stringer Greg McElroy, who showed composure by going 5 for 7 and leading the Jets to their only score yesterday, but it was enough to win the game. It’s almost more important that McElroy did nothing to lose the game, which is something that seems to be beyond the capabilities of Mark Sanchez.

Of course now Rex is saying he needs more time to make the decision on who will be starting the next game against Jacksonville, where they are removing the tarps to accommodate Tebow-mania. What will Rex decide? It really doesn’t matter. This bed was made in the off-season and the results through thirteen weeks have proven that Ryan has been wrong to stubbornly stick with Sanchez in the hopes that Sanchez would improve. And it was Rex Ryan who removed his best alternative by bringing in Tebow. While McElroy helped the Jets win an ugly defensive contest, it seems clear that the future of success at quarterback is not currently on the Jets’ roster. If the Jets’ brass is smart (and I question if they really are), Mike Tannenbaum and Rex Ryan won’t be controlling or managing that roster in 2013.

Time for you to lie down in what you made, Rex.

UPDATE (12/5): Rex Ryan has determined that Mark Sanchez will be the starter this weekend in Jacksonville. What’s that again about the definition of insanity being doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result? I’ll say this for him; he’s consistent.

Ghost Rat

Football fan and longtime follower of the New England Patriots. Happily married father, professional, and author.

  3 Responses to “Is the Sanchez Era finally over? Will Rex Ryan get the blame he deserves?”

  1. I assume you are lumping in Tannebaum with Rex when you talk about them bringing in Tebow. I think that was a Woody move, but Mike and Rex would have had to go along. They all deserve the blame.

  2. Yes, Mike. I think Tebow was Woody’s idea, but Rex went along with it. Then Tannebaum had to commit a ton of money to Sanchez to soothe his ego. But ultimately Rex chose to stick with a quarterback who I genuinely believe he knew was never going to develop into a good quarterback. I’s time to blow it up from the GM on down.

  3. I think moving Stanton was the most egregious miscalculation. The Jets went in to the season with no safety net and they are paying the price.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.